Category: Book Review

Backstabbing: Literally or Metaphorically? A Review of Paula Hawkins’ The Girl on the Train

The Girl on the Train – a simple everyday journey that takes a turn for the worst into a tale of drunk dialing, anger and frustration, and a woman gone missing. The novel begins with three storytellers: Rachel, Megan, and Anna. Rachel fell into hard times when her marriage with Tom failed as he left…

Fairy Tales meet the Real World in The Grimoire of Kensington Market (Review)

From the first chapter of ​The Grimoire of Kensington Market​, I knew I was going to love this book. To start, the story is based in Toronto, which is such a beautiful city; secondly, like most authors included in the Lorenzo Reading Series, the author is Canadian. I don’t generally focus on where the authors…

We all want to believe (until we stop believing): Craig Davidson’s The Saturday Night Ghost Club (Review)

Did you have an “I Want to Believe” poster on your wall? You know, the one with the blurred image of a flying saucer floating over a forest – the one that hangs in Fox Mulder’s office in the basement of the FBI in The X-Files? If so, Craig Davidson’s The Saturday Night Ghost Club…

Cli-Fi: Canadian writers tackle climate change with science fiction short stories (Review)

Anyone who prefers reading short stories or wants some light reading should try out Cli-Fi: Canadian Tales of Climate Change edited by Lorenzo Reading Series alumnus Bruce Meyer. A great thing about this book is that it is Canadian, so all the stories are based in familiar places like Toronto and Vancouver; some of the…

A Man Among the Stars: Elton John Gets Real About his Life in Me

2019 has been, without a doubt, the Year of Elton John. He has been playing sold-out shows all over the world following the kickoff of his massive farewell tour; his biopic Rocketman was released to critical acclaim over the summer; and now his tell-all memoir, Me, is flying off shelves faster than bookstores can stock…

David Sedaris Tickles Reader’s Funny Bone with Truthful Tales in Calypso (Review)

Renowned comedian David Sedaris, author of Naked (1997) and Me Talk Pretty One Day (2000), is back and better than ever in Calypso, his humorous and heartfelt memoir published in 2018. What truly sets Calypso apart from so many memoirs on the market today, be they comedic or agonizingly serious, is that his story and…

Bird Box: an International Phenomenon – but is it Good? (Feature)

Bird Box is a suspenseful, horrifying thriller that keeps you on the edge of your seat. I was immediately captivated by the story from the very first page, and I could not resist reading this entire book in one sitting. We are introduced to Malorie, a mother of two young children, who will do whatever…

Jennifer’s Book Segment: Zombies vs. Unicorns (Review)

About the Book: It’s a question as old as time itself: which is better, the zombie or the unicorn? In this anthology, edited by Holly Black and Justine Larbalestier (unicorn and zombie, respectively), strong arguments are made for both sides in the form of short stories. Half of the stories portray the strengths–for good and…

Jan Wong takes readers on a cultural adventure with Apron Strings (Book Review)

A multi-talented journalist with an astonishing work history and a current professor of journalism at St. Thomas University, Jan Wong’s writing never disappoints – and Apron Strings was no exception to the norm. By cultivating the humor, sass and charm that make up her unique voice, Wong brings autobiography and cookbooks together for a delicious…

Jennifer’s Book Segment: Clockwork Angel (Review)

In this episode of Jennifer’s Book Segment, originally aired on Local FM on February 28th of 2018, Jennifer talks with co-creator of The Lorenzo Review, Andrea Kikuchi, about Clockwork Angel by Cassandra Clare. Clockwork Angel is the first book in The Infernal Devices series. Check back next Tuesday for her review of its sequel, Clockwork Prince!   About…